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London Clojure Dojo at uSwitch

  • uSwitch 5 Copper Row London, England, SE1 2LH United Kingdom (map)

uSwitch is located on the first floor of the ZPG building at 5 Copper Row, London, SE1 2LH, London (Click on the map for directions)

The Clojure dojo is a collaborative way to learn Clojure/ClojureScript through practice. The aim is to learn a little more than before you started. This event is for those new to coding through to more experienced developers.

We organise into small groups (2-4) people and write code to solve challenges great and small, chosen by those at the event.

We aim to ensure someone in your group has some Clojure experience, so you shouldn't feel lost (well no more than all developers do when Stack Overflow is broken).

Example challenges for the coding dojo are listed on this website: http://www.londonclojurians.org/code-dojo/

# Approximate schedule:

18:40 Doors open and start collecting suggestions
18.45 Pizza should have arrived
19:00 Quick intros and vote on suggestions
19:15 Break out into groups and start practising
21:00 Gather together for a quick show and tell

# What should I bring?

We organise into small groups, so if you have a laptop with a working Clojure environment please bring it along (there are lots of online Clojure environments, so you can just use your browser too).

# How do I get in to the building?

Look for the big ZPG sign and at the glass doors press the buzzer to inform the security guard you are here. Say you are here for the event on the first floor.

Is there way to talk with the Clojure community?

Why yes. The Clojurians Slack channel is full of friendly people who love to try and help. People based in London are often in the #clojure-uk channel. Sign up for a free account to the Clojurians Slack community via http://clojurians.net/

What is Clojure?

Clojure is a JVM language that has syntactically similarities to Lisp, full integration with Java and its libraries and focuses on providing a solution to the issue of single machine concurrency.

Its small core makes it surprisingly easy for Java developers to pick up and it provides a powerful set of concurrency strategies and data structures designed to make immutable data easy to work with. If you went to Rich Hickey’s LJC talk about creating Clojure you’ll already know this, if not it’s well worth watching the Rich Hickey “Clojure for Java Programmers” video or Stuart Halloway “Radical Simplicity” video .